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The American Caliban

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RIAA, 1700 [Nov. 15th, 2006|07:27 pm]
The American Caliban
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This mode of travelling, which by Englishmen of the present day would be regarded as insufferably slow, seemed to our ancestors wonderfully and indeed alarmingly rapid. In a work published a few months before the death of Charles the Second, the flying coaches are extolled as far superior to any similar vehicles ever known in the world. Their velocity is the subject of special commendation, and is triumphantly contrasted with the sluggish pace of the continental posts. But with boasts like these was mingled the sound of complaint and invective. The interests of large classes had been unfavourably affected by the establishment of the new diligences; and, as usual, many persons were, from mere stupidity and obstinacy, disposed to clamour against the innovation, simply because it was an innovation. It was vehemently argued that this mode of conveyance would be fatal to the breed of horses and to the noble art of horsemanship; that the Thames, which had long been an important nursery of seamen, would cease to be the chief thoroughfare from London up to Windsor and down to Gravesend; that saddlers and spurriers would be ruined by hundreds; that numerous inns, at which mounted travellers had been in the habit of stopping, would be deserted, and would no longer pay any rent; that the new carriages were too hot in summer and too cold in winter; that the passengers were grievously annoyed by invalids and crying children; that the coach sometimes reached the inn so late that it was impossible to get supper, and sometimes started so early that it was impossible to get breakfast. On these grounds it was gravely recommended that no public coach should be permitted to have more than four horses, to start oftener than once a week, or to go more than thirty miles a day. It was hoped that, if this regulation were adopted, all except the sick and the lame would return to the old mode of travelling. Petitions embodying such opinions as these were presented to the King in council from several companies of the City of London, from several provincial towns, and from the justices of several counties. We Smile at these things. It is not impossible that our descendants, when they read the history of the opposition offered by cupidity and prejudice to the improvements of the nineteenth century, may smile in their turn.The History of England from the Accession of James II
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Comments:
[User Picture]From: nebris
2006-11-16 03:38 am (UTC)

the opposition offered by cupidity and prejudice

Yes, indeed, sir. I can think of many among those who could use a good old fashioned horse whipping.

~M~
(Reply) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: maps_or_guitars
2006-11-16 02:35 pm (UTC)
Wow. And I thought I was ultraconservative in my desire for a return of the gold standard, and the renewal of ties to England. Does this mean I have to learn to ride?
(Reply) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: torgo_x
2006-11-16 11:07 pm (UTC)

Woarsies

Whither baleeeeeeeeen?
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